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These Are The World’s Most Isolated Places And Structures

World's Most Isolated Places And Structuresvia
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All of us at some point or the other express that we need to be out of the city life and go to a place that is silent and isolated. There are a few people in this world who live in the world and are out of it at the same time. They live in the most isolated places in the world. Let us have a look at where are these places.

 

1. Casa Do Penedo, Portugal

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Casa Do Penedo is also referred to as the stone house. It is located in the Fafe mountains in Portugal. It is hard to believe but it was constructed between four massive boulders. Though it looks like a Stone Age home, the house was built in 1974. The house does not have access to electricity, candles are used to light up the place. However, it has a cozy fireplace and a swimming pool.

 

2. Village Of Gasadalur, Vagar Faroe Islands

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Faroe Island falls in between Iceland and Norway and is a self-governing archipelago of Denmark. The island is quite difficult to get to, it has steep cliffs from all sides, and massive mountain peaks. In 2004, a tunnel was blasted through the mountain which accorded the access of automobiles into the village. The village had a microscopic population of 18 as of 2012. However, the island carries breathtaking views and beautiful but its inaccessibility makes the site both difficult to visit and to live in.

 

3. The Holy Trinity Monastery, Greece

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High up the rocky hills of Meteora lies not one but six monasteries all of which are still functioning today. The Holy Trinity is the oldest of the six. The entrance of the Monastery can be accessed via a series of 140 steps that are quite challenging to climb. Meteora is also one of the UNESCO world heritage sites.

 

4. Ghost Town, Namibia

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Kolmanskop was a diamond mining town in the early 1900s and has now turned into a completely abandoned desert. Earlier it attracted a large mass due to its diamonds, especially Germans. But since the prices of the diamond fell by large numbers post the First World War, the town was no longer a hub for business. It was abandoned completely. Presently it is a tourist destination despite being turned into a ghostly museum of homes swallowed by sand dunes.

Anushka Jain
the authorAnushka Jain